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March 20, 2022

Since we opened in 2015, we've strived to connect the food we eat to its agricultural setting. We found the best way to make that connection was through a table and a hands-on experience that honors the healthy-practices of farming food while gathering together those dependent upon healthy farming practices.

When you drive to Locavore you are surrounded by commodity crops used as the inputs grown for other products that are eventually consumed. The largest U.S. crops are corn, soy and wheat and they go through many systems before you'll see them on your dinner plate. Let's face it, we don't think about food and eating when we drive through rural farmland. And that's where we want to see a change. We seek to create sustainable and profitable opportunities for local vegetable and meat producers who farm without harmful chemicals or in-humane practices.

In order to do so, we must challenge the marketplace by presenting truer costs for good food and the expense of local family-run operations. The good work of farming and growing food for communities should be encouraged as a viable opportunity for an entrepreneur. And honestly, that's what farmers are and should be - not merely indentured laborers of the land they 'sort-of' own, to contribute to an industry propped up by a much larger machine. Our desire is to see a sovereign food system comprised of independent farm operations, setting price and practice according to the needs and desires of the customers they serve.

The way that happens is by becoming a more conscientious consumer, participating and investing in the smaller markets, close to home. We all know this is a better way, but unplugging may feel too hard. We're still as busy as ever and the lure of clicking a button and having what we want on-demand has become our norm. Trust me, I know. But let's just give it a try - for the sake of tomorrow.

Through the years, we've seen guests around our table become farmers and hobby or small operations rise up as major players in the local food system and marketplace. Each of those listed below collaborate or participate in our experience:

Black Oaks Center, Five Hands Farm, Gatto Family Farm, Gray Farms, Happy Life Ranch, Irie Farms, Janie's Mill, Rocky Road Dairy, Sunnyside Flowers, The Flower Cart, Smalltown Coffee, Stefari Coffee, Native Leather Co., Frankfort Candle Company, Andy Palmer Designs, Marcia's Macarons, La Voute Bistro, Provecho, and Lou Lou Belle.

Stay tuned. Next week we'll spill the beans on our upcoming makers market, featuring art in action and tours of Sumac Creek Farms, an Earth Day event, and more on how to book your farm stay with us this season.

Until next week,

Rachael Jones